Quiz Weightwithin December 13, 2021
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Do you feel loved when people are paying attention to you?
Do you ever feel responsible for someone else’s upset even when others tell you it is not your problem to handle or care about?
Do feel like you have too much to do?
Do you get your feelings hurt easily?
Do you get frustrated at yourself for crying too easily?
Do you feel that life is always or often difficult?
Do you get overwhelmed easily?
Do you wish other people would know what you want without having to ask?
Do you feel like you can’t win no matter how hard you try?
Do you feel like you are doing everything you can to please others and it’s never enough?
Do people see you as overly emotional or dramatic?
Do you feel like you are always the one trying harder in relationships with family, friends, and/or significant others?
Do you ever assume or fear that others see you as less capable or incompetent?
Is it difficult for you to make decisions?
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Check Answers
Thank you for taking the time to look more closely at your emotional eating patterns. Based
on your answers, you have many qualities of a Type 1 emotional eater. Being a Type 1 has a lot to do with how you
relate to others and the world around you. This part of your personality started to take shape around age 3-7. Food
may or may not have been emotional for you at that time, but chances are that you felt somewhat over-controlled. The
truth is, children really do not have much control over their lives. The significant adults in your life may have
been controlling with a “my way or the highway” mentality, or they may have been somewhat perfectionistic in their
expectations and messages to you.
As Type 1’s get older, they struggle with momentum. When we believe people are attempting to control us or do not
think we are performing to their standards, our reaction is either to attempt to comply with their desires and
expectations or to rebel against them. Type 1’s learned early that while they may say “yes” to others, they may also
have no intention of complying with their request. The result of this inner turmoil can lead to an “all or nothing”
cycle. This cycle plays out in the constant on- or off-a-diet mentality. When you are “on,” you are being “good,”
and when you are “off,” you are eating all the “bad” stuff. To others, Type 1’s may seem lazy, checked-out, or
uncaring, but that is not the case. They have a tremendous internal struggle with feeling incapable and therefore
fear trying to be successful with food or any other meaningful task because it may inevitably lead to failure.
In my programs, you will learn how to say “yes” and how to say “no” without feeling stuck. Life does not have to be
a struggle. You can learn to feel a sense of control unlike anything you have previously experienced. You will learn
that food and eating are not “all or nothing” and you can have the relationship with food you thought was
impossible.

Thank you for taking the time to look more closely at your emotional eating patterns. Based
on your quiz results, you have many qualities of a Type 2 emotional eater. This part of your personality started to
take shape around age 3-7. Food may or may not have been emotional for you at that time, but you were already
getting messages about your role in your family and the ways you were expected to relate with others. In childhood,
Type 2’s get confusing messages about what they need to do in order to show love and be loved. As kids, Type 2’s are
sometimes made to feel good about their looks or cute personality but not really for their capabilities. They learn
that their worth comes from making the people around them happy, and therefore, when people around them are unhappy,
they need to do everything they can to “fix” things for them
Through your childhood experiences, you somehow got the inner message that pleasing other people is your lot in life
and your worthiness is contingent upon it. What does this have to do with food? When you say “yes” to everyone else
in the hopes that they will be pleased with you, you are saying “no” to yourself. This can lead to exhaustion,
overwhelm, and a need for comfort. This comes at a cost. Type 2’s need to create emotional safety for themselves and
implement self-care into their lives. When Type 2’s slow down and start taking care of themselves, their
relationship with food changes
In my programs, you will begin to recognize your strengths and intelligence as well as how to set boundaries and
stick to them. With support, you will accept that some lack of harmony with others is a necessary part of growth and
change. When someone is displeased with you or suggests you made a mistake, you will no longer jump to the
conclusion that they see you as incompetent or that they think little of you. You will learn to safely express
anger, hurt, and/or frustration. The result will be a renewed sense of energy for your own self-care that will
enable you to change your food patterns and achieve your goals.


Thank you for taking the time to look more closely at your emotional eating patterns. Based on your
answers, you have combined qualities of both a Type 1 and Type 2 emotional eater. This part of
your personality started to take shape around age 3-7. Food may or may not have been emotional
for you at that time, but it is likely that you received many messages about how to please others.
In addition, the significant adults in your life may have been controlling with a “my way or the
highway” mentality, or they may have been unhappy or preoccupied leaving you with an unhealthy
level of concern for their well-being.
As a combined type, you likely have significant struggles with all or nothing thinking in addition to
boundaries. Meaning that when people around you are unhappy, it is difficult for you to just allow
them the time and space to figure things out on their own; however, you may also feel that other
people really do not show up for you in your time of need. This combination of feelings can often get
you stuck and stop you from progressing in your goals with food and healthy living. Being “all in or all
out” disrupts your momentum and being sensitive to the people around you makes you easily
triggered into losing steam for your healthy living goals. This combination can make overcoming
emotional eating seem overwhelming, but I assure you it is not as daunting as it seems.
The good news is these negative patterns can begin to change when you step out of your stuck position and take
ownership. In my programs, you will learn how to say “yes” and how to say “no” without feeling stuck. You will learn
to safely express anger, hurt, and/or frustration. The result will be a renewed sense of energy for your own
self-care that will enable you to change your food patterns and achieve your goals.